How to lose weight fast: Changing this ONE habit will help you slash belly fat

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WEIGHT LOSS: People who eat in front of the TV consume 10% more calories

If you really want to and get ripped you’re going to have to work hard, but there is one easy lifestyle change that could help shift the pounds.

Are you guilting of gorging in front of the TV? If you spend every evening eating dinner off your lap while you catch up on Love Island or your favourite soap you are likely to pile on the pounds.

People who eat while they watch TV consume 10% more calories without realising, studies have found. 

Eating while distracted means you mindlessly pour food into your mouth and tend to eat later in the day – another factor which makes people out on weight.

A review of 24 past studies by British researchers discovered the habit makes us pile on the pounds.

In one study, adult men and women watched TV while eating. In another, participants snacked on pistachio nuts and experimenters immediately removed the nut shells from view.

The analysis suggests statistically significant differences between participants who ate attentively and those who ate while distracted.

“Even though we make decisions about what and when to eat with apparent ease all the time, these decisions are actually very complex and can be easily disrupted,” said Dr Suzanne Higgs, a study co-author and psychologist at the University of Birmingham.

Eating in front of the TV also conditions your brain so you feel hungry every time you switch it on.

This means you are more likely to reach for unhealthy snacks if you’re a big telly fan.

Cutting down on your TV time and eating dinner at the dinning table are two easy ways you can slim down without actively going on a diet or upping your exercise regime.

However the NHS recommend adults aged 19 to 64 should try to be active daily. They also recommend doing at east 50 minutes of moderate aerobic activity such as cycling or brisk walking every week and two or more straight exercises a week.

This article originally appeared here via Google News